Kate Terry’s practice encompasses sculpture, installation and drawing, exploring the relationships between points, lines angles, and forms from their defining conditions. Echoing the sloping walls and geometric forms within the fabric of our building, and drawing on references to the regularity of Minimalism, these site-specific installations respond directly to the architecture of the spaces they inhabit. Indeed for the first time the Louise H. McCagg staircase, a prominent Zaha Hadid design feature, has been activated and installed with artwork, serving to both highlight and interpret the space itself. Employing everyday materials with economy and restraint, intricate geometric patterns emerge amid hundreds of taut, straight lines which intersect and create new architectures within the gallery space—shapes which themselves might suggest awnings or smaller spaces to explore. Color—and ideas of the preexisting associations that the viewer may link to certain colors—is also a particular interest, explored through the use of bright, fluorescent threads that, while on the spool appear intense, but become subtle and almost disappear when stretched out. As it becomes unclear where the installation begins and ends, the viewer’s perception of depth, and of the shapes and structures in space, is disrupted, and we are encouraged to engage differently with the interior space that surrounds us. 

Caitlín Doherty
Curator and Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs  

Kate Terry: Suspended Space is organized by the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University and curated by Caitlín Doherty, Curator and Deputy Director of Curatorial Affairs. Support for this exhibition is provided by the Elizabeth Halsted endowment fund.